Civil Rights

Scenes from after the Wyatt Correctional Officer attack on the Never Again Providence protesters

After a Wyatt Correctional Officer drove his pickup truck into a group of sitting, peaceful protesters outside the Wyatt Detention Facility Wednesday night, followed by a group of about a dozen more correctional officers assaulting and pepper spraying the protesters, Central Falls Police officers arrived on the scene. Below are scenes of the police officers interacting with the protesters, and
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Published on August 15, 2019
By Steve Ahlquist

After a Wyatt Correctional Officer drove his pickup truck into a group of sitting, peaceful protesters outside the Wyatt Detention Facility Wednesday night, followed by a group of about a dozen more correctional officers assaulting and pepper spraying the protesters, Central Falls Police officers arrived on the scene.

Below are scenes of the police officers interacting with the protesters, and the emergency medical interventions that were being administered.

Kimberly Dicupe describes being pepper sprayed:

it was a very chaotic scene. Below, Jerry Belair explains that there is a normal process for dealing with such protests. You simply call the police and have the protesters arrested. Also, Roger Williams university Law Professor Jared Goldstein spoke about being pepper sprayed in the fac, but being told that since he was still breathing, there were other people who needed more immediate care.

Rhode Island peace activist David Oppenheimer was trying to calm the protesters after the truck plowed into them. He was also pepper sprayed.

The correctional officers, including the man who drove his truck into the crowd, marched away behind a fence.

Jerry Belair and Jackie, who were both hit by the pickup truck, are taken away in ambulances.

74 year old Ellen Bar-Zemer was hit with pepper spray, and was also taken to the hospital.

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