Connect with us

Civil Rights

Black Lives Matter march and rally in Burrillville

Published

on

As a white-passing person, this protest was founded with only my best intentions of fostering unity to support and amplify the voices and demands of Black people.


On Thursday, Burrillville, located in the northwest corner of the state, became the latest town in Rhode Island to hold a rally in support of Black Lives. The event started by Eccleston Field, then about 50 people marched to a small park by Harrison Mill Pond. After saying the names of many Black persons who died due to police violence and injustice, the protesters lined the sidewalk and laid face down on the concrete, arms behind their backs, for eight minutes and 46 seconds, the amount of time a Minneapolis police officer knelt on George Floyd‘s neck, killing him.

Officers from the Burrillville Police Department escorted and marched with the protesters, mostly young people, to ensure their safety.

Organizer Nikki Felice beginning the march

Nikki Felice, who organized the protest, released her statement on Instagram:

“In light of national unrest, it was only after recognizing three facts that I realized I cannot be silent.
  1. It is today’s youth that creates tomorrow’s future
  2. You don’t have to live in a big metropolitan area to have your voice heard.
  3. The most precious thing in my life right now, has a target on her back.
“As a white-passing person, this protest was founded with only my best intentions of fostering unity to support and amplify the voices and demands of Black people.
“I created this event with Burrillville’s demographic in mind. In no way is this demonstration meant to infringe upon the views of the Black community nor to speak directly on their behalf, but rather to show our support.”

Here’s the march:

The reading of the names:


Can you help us?

Funding for our reporting relies entirely on the generosity of readers like you. Our independence allows us to write stories that hold RI state and local government officials accountable. All of our stories are free and available to everyone. But your support is essential to keeping Steve and Will on the beat, covering the costs of reporting many stories in a single day. If you are able to, please support Uprise RI. Every contribution, big or small is so valuable to us. You provide the motivation and financial support to keep doing what we do. Thank you.

Become a Patron!
Opens in a new tab - you won't lose you place

Eight minutes and 46 seconds of silence:

Photos:

Steve Ahlquist is a frontline reporter in Rhode Island. He has covered human rights, social justice, progressive politics and environmental news for nearly a decade. atomicsteve@gmail.com