“Lead poisoning remains a real problem that affects too many kids, and it’s taken a great deal of effort to create and fund these kinds of grants,” said Reed.


The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) awarded more than $12.4M to protect Rhode Island children and families from lead-based paint and home health hazards. This funding is part of $314M being awarded nationally to 77 state and local government agencies, a record investment.

“These grants will help Rhode Island communities to protect families from lead exposure and other significant health and safety hazards,” said Davis Tille, HUD New England Regional Administrator. “I want to thank Senator Jack Reed for his leadership and commitment to making homes safe for children, we would not be here today without his support.”

“Lead poisoning remains a real problem that affects too many kids, and it’s taken a great deal of effort to create and fund these kinds of grants,” said United States Senator Jack Reed, the Ranking Member of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development (THUD), who created the program. “It is critical that we do our part to protect children. This grant will get at the root of the problem by identifying families that need help, removing lead hazards in the home, and making properties safe for kids today, and future generations. There is both a moral imperative to get this done and an economic one because making our communities safe from lead saves taxpayers in the long run.”

RI Housing will be awarded $7,841,160 in Lead Based Paint Hazard Reduction grant program funding and $599,800 in Healthy Homes Supplemental funding. RIHousing will address lead hazards in 340 housing units providing safer homes for low-income families with children. They will also perform healthy homes assessments in 118 units, and work with other medical and social service providers. RIHousing is one of seven grantees in the country to be awarded funds to help their “High Impact Neighborhood” where they will conduct lead hazard control and healthy homes work intensively in a targeted neighborhood impacted by poor housing conditions. RIHousing’s High Impact Neighborhoods are Pawtucket and Central Falls.

“With some of the oldest housing stock in the country, Rhode Island homeowners need resources to ensure their homes are safe, healthy and properly maintained,” said Carol Ventura, Executive Director of RIHousing. “Reducing home-based health hazards such as lead ensures Rhode Island residents remain healthy in their homes. We thank Senator Reed for his leadership on this important issue and look froward to deploying these resources.”



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