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Proposed Port garbage transfer station is dead

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“This was a win for the community,” said Linda Perri, President of the Washington Park Neighborhood Association. “It is so great that everybody got behind this. It became a movement. It showed that real people really do care about injustice and the climate.


Allens Providence Recycling LLC has withdrawn their application to build a new transfer station on the corner of Allens Avenue and Thurbers Avenue in the Port of Providence, which would have brought an estimated 188 diesel trucks in and out of an area that is already the epicenter of asthma in Rhode Island.

Though the developer still owns the land, and may resubmit applications for businesses on the land in the future, right now the project is dead.

“The City Plan Commission (CPC) received a withdrawal from the applicant of the proposed private transfer station at 481 Allens Ave,” said spokesperson Katherine Hypolite on behalf of the City of Providence Department of Planning and Development. “This matter will not be heard by the CPC at the regularly scheduled meeting on March 17, 2020. For the matter to come back before the CPC, a new application must be filed.”

“This was due in large part to the advocacy from our neighbors in Lower-South Providence and Washington Park, our partners in local and state government, and the many community groups that have spoken out against this facility that was intended for our backyards,” said Providence City Councilmember Pedro Espinal (Ward 10) who helped lead the fight against the proposed facility. “No longer will Lower-South Providence and Washington Park be a dumping ground. We deserve better, and I will work every day to make sure that happens.”

“This was a win for the community,” said Linda Perri, President of the Washington Park Neighborhood Association. “It is so great that everybody got behind this. It became a movement. It showed that real people really do care about injustice and the climate. It put a laser-like focus on South Providence. I would like to see that land developed into a green, clean solar field, something to benefit the community.”


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“We are so happy about this news!!” message Monica Huertas, who heads up No LNG in PVD. “This is going to be the first of many victories in the coming years. We ask our community to continue with us in this conversation and help us continue to say no to any new proposed junk industries in our city.”

“The decision to scrap plans for this garbage depot is an unqualified win for the neighborhood,” said Kevin Budris, staff attorney at Conservation Law Foundation (CLF) Rhode Island. “The community was loud and clear in opposing the toxic exhaust and dust this dirty facility would produce. We need to put our efforts into reducing waste, rather than forcing our communities to deal with pollution from trash that they did not create.”

As a result of the news, the protest at the site of the site of the proposed transfer station that was to happen tomorrow has been cancelled, as has the call for people to turn out at the March 17 Providence City Plan Commission (CPC) board meeting.

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