Oped: ProJo, your bias is showing

Dear Providence Journal and to whom it may concern,

This article (see: Editorial: No expert on R.I. energy) reads like someone in the pocket of fossil-fuel interests. I’m not saying that we aren’t using fossil-fuels to bridge the way forward, the problem there is when people think that means we need to invest in NEW fossil-fuel infrastructure, which loses sight of the long-term plans of transitioning to a modern electric grid shifted heavily towards newer, superior technologies (yes, renewable energies).

As a region we are well equipped to make the transition using our ample coastline for wind power and we have already seen success from solar energy growing at an exponential rate. People often overlook how an exponential curve works, but so far renewable energy continues to exceed expectations and we would be far better suited to refurbish the compressor station already in Burrillville and to fix and maintain current fossil fuel infrastructure, which can in turn be decommissioned on a proper timeline and even transformed to fit a more modern grid. In Massachusetts closed coal plants are switching to 100 percent solar power. The writing is on the wall.

Those that have followed this proposed power plant are aware of the constant misinformation and shady moves the company Invenergy uses, and know better than to listen to tired rhetoric about the pros of burning fossil fuels for energy. Again yes, though we need fossil fuels in the immediate, there is little to no validity in the assumption that we need a project like this; not to mention the location they are proposing to site this facility comes with endless concerns particularly from a company that can’t seem to properly handle the application and siting process.

ProJo, your bias shows again.

Sincerely,
Chris Quiray”

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About Chris Quiray 1 Article
Chris Quiray is a solar professional who specializes in outreach and fundraising for non-profits and charities. His mission is to create a positive measurable impact and to progress the renewable energy movement. He is the founder of The Solar Guy, an online presence used to raise awareness and advocate for the switch to renewable energy sources.

3 Comments

  1. If anyone really contemplates how fast the trasnsition to fossil fuels needs to be, the idea of building NO NEW fossil fuel infrastructure makes more and more sense daily. When you are in a hole and want to get out, the first thing you do is stop digging deper.

  2. Mr. Achorn has thus far declined to print my recent letter to the Providence Journal. Here it is if I can make this work:
    Letters to the editor – Providence Journal 2/5/2018

    The Providence Journal Editorial Board appears to believe they are qualified to disparage the R.I. Attorney General regarding his reasoning for speaking out in opposition of the Invenergy power plant proposal because Mr. Kilmartin is not an “energy expert” (“No expert on R.I. energy”, February 2, 2018). In addition, the board on numerous occasions, including this piece, has used pejoratives to describe opponents, including those with credible science backgrounds (NIMBY/BANANA). An opinion, yes, but espousing childish and unprofessional journalism from the only major newspaper editorial board in the state is an embarrassment.

    The board appears to be taking their argument for CREC directly from the fossil fuel playbook, claiming “the experts” presented by Invenergy must be accepted as true and unbiased.

    The fossil fuel industry has not been truthful, nor has it endeared itself, to private citizens (eminent domain, toxic waste, methane leaks, oil spills, environmental injustices) and our R.I. Energy Facility Siting Board is not without flaws. Yet, the editorial board demeans those who are asking valid questions and demanding transparent answers. Perhaps the board has not read about the detrimental effects of global warming caused by man, of which the fossil fuel industry is complicit.

    R.I. energy bills rise in winter because we live where it is cold and the industry charges us more, because they can, when demand is high. We do not know for sure if the price owed on an electric bill will, in fact, go down if CREC is built. We do know that the price we will pay in health, and environment, will surely go up.

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